Black People Don’t Read Science Fiction: New Blog Tackles Multiculturalism in Fantasy, Futuristic, and Paranormal Stories

Alicia Mccalla and her uncle at a young ageAlicia and her uncle old

 One of the worse fights I’ve had was with my uncle who was a few years older than me.  It wasn’t just a battle of words but a knock down drag out physical fight with me clutching hold to my weird books and him trying to pry them out of my skinny little hands.  I think he was trying to save me. Some 20 years later; I get it. He didn’t want anyone to think that his quirky niece was weird.

Alicia McCalla at a young age

I’m mean, let’s get real, I wasn’t a geeky little white boy from the suburbs. I was a little black girl from Detroit.  In fact, I would be considered a “hood rat” by today’s standards.

Although I understand it now, my uncle’s words still ring in my ears when I’m reading my weird stories, “Black people don’t read that weird white trash.”

Since I was an avid reader, I took to writing early. I loved writing my strange stories. Whenever I would share my stories, I would get the look. One teacher even put her hand on my shoulder and said, “Honey, why don’t you write a normal story. Nobody really wants to read all of that weird stuff.”  So I did what we all do, I hid my love for Sci-Fi.  I took to reading and writing it in secret. When the Sci-Fi channel  came on, I would watch the shows in private. My own special moments…

Until, one day I said “to hell with all those people.” I just grew-up. I stood up to everyone and proclaimed my love for the weird, unusual, paranormal, outlandish, and strange. 

“I love sci-fi and I’m not gonna take it anymore!”  My poor husband looked at me and said, “It’s ok honey. I understand.” 

Alicia and Howard in LA

Welcome to my secret love! Here, I will discuss the world of fantasy, futuristic, and paranormal stories from a black women’s perspective but even more with a multicultural lens. I’d like to openly discuss why it’s important for people of color to be a part of and represented within the Sci-Fi paradigm.  Let me know how you feel.

I’m looking for people who care about bringing multiculturalism into the world of the unusual, different, and strange.  Star Trek changed the world when Captain Kirk kissed Lieutenant Uhura.  That’s real power! If Sci-Fi can help change a nation then it should certainly be inclusive.

Picture of Alicia posing in an author photo

Please join me in my journey to analyzing multiculturalism in fantasy, futuristic, and paranormal stories. I know that there’s more people out there like me.  If you’re there, let me know…

Relevant Links

 http://fanlore.org/wiki/Race_and_Fandom

 

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