Origins boxset web copy
Books

Origins of an African Elemental (1-3)

Available  Now for Download and in Print! And the tale of the African Elementals begins…  This prequel boxed set is the first, second and third installment in the African Elemental series.  Mawu, Iniko, and Shania grow into their strength as mothers and warriors. These  women wield the elements and war swords to save this universe […]

topten
Blog

Top Ten Blog Posts

toptenI’m always amazed at the number of hits that I receive on my blog.  Each week I post and I wonder if people are interested in posts that deal with race, class, and gender in Scifi, Paranormal and Futuristic books, movies, and TV series. 

I get excited whenever an awesome post takes off like lightening.  I thought I’d re-share some of those amazing discussions and believe me, some of those posts, get heated…

 

 

Revealing Eden
Blog

From White Racial Superiority to Mother of an Evolved Species: A Critical Analysis of Save the Pearls

Revealing EdenLast week, one of my former students emailed me in distress over this series, “Save the Pearls.” Her anger stemmed from the obvious racially negative subtext (conscious and unconscious) that related to whites as “pearls” and blacks as “coals” in this controversial YA novel.

Admittedly, I was horrified by the obvious racial insensitivities within the first book’s descriptions on Amazon as well as on the “Save the Pearls” website, where the love interest, Jamal, has the astrological sign labeled “pimp.” The book trailer also was very disturbing with a young, blond woman in black face, telling her tale of reverse discrimination in her post apocalyptic world where her white skin makes her genetically-inferior and unable to handle the “heat.” Could someone really publish such a book in the 21st century? But what worried me the most was that this book was written for teens.

Abandon_TV_Series
Blog

Guest Fest: The Abandon, An All Black Male Sci‐Fi TV Series by Keith Josef Adkins

Abandon_TV_SeriesSo, here’s the deal:  I’m creating a sci-fi series called The Abandon.  On July 27, 2012 I’m shooting the pilot episode, which will follow the journeys of five black men after a global alien invasion.  Yes, I said five black men.  I know that’s revolutionary for television, but hey, I am committed to changing the game.  I’m particularly interested in changing the game when it comes to black representation and inclusiveness in sci-fi TV and film.

Paper_Bag
Blog

The State of Black Sci-Fi 2012: Why is it Important to Show Race, Culture, Minority Politics or Ethnicity in Sci-Fi?

Paper_BagWoohoo! I’m excited that we’re at Day 3 in our discussion of Black Science Fiction. Don’t forget about the incredible giveaways coming up February 6th. This week we’re discussing if it’s important to show race, culture, minority politics, or ethnicity in Sci-Fi. K. Let’s talk. 

I remember the day that my grandmother told me that she interviewed (in her youth) for a position at a local retailer but was unable to get the job because she didn’t pass the paper bag test. Yup. That’s right. My grandmother wasn’t lighter than a paper bag and so she couldn’t get that job.

Skinwalker
Blog

Race Matters: Showing Race and Racial Issues is Important

SkinwalkerSo, I like it when an author puts race in front of my eyes.  I enjoy visualizing what a character looks like, race and all.  When it’s done correctly, the experience can deepen the reader’s relationship with the character.  There are some people who say that showing race in this way is racist.  They enjoy reading or writing raceless, race free, or characters of color with little or no physical description. I contend that this approach is racist.

Deleyna_web_2
Blog

Guest Blogger Deleyna Marr: It’s All About POV. The Need to Write Multicultural SciFi.

Deleyna_web_2I do not believe I am a racist. And yet I can make thoughtless comments, be oblivious, be hurtful without realization or intent. Like when I offered a hairdrier to a black friend. Hey, I thought I was being helpful. Forget color-blind. I can be down-right blind.

I don’t classify people by race. Why? I grew up with parents who were from the deep south. They would whisper things like, “well, he’s black…” as if that would explain something. Those comments made me ill. I grew up in Silicon Valley in the middle of the dot com boom. My early jobs were so multi-cultural that to me the world was a rainbow. I tour guided at a museum that drew international tourists and tried to learn phrases in as many languages as I could.