Rasheedah
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Guest Fest: Using Afrofuturism to Re-Examine Our Past By Rasheedah Phillips

RasheedahThe Future is already Here. It’s just unevenly distributed.

William Gibson

 

The word “futurism” embedded in the term Afrofuturism denotes a forward-looking aesthetic or theme that envisions the prospective future of humanity. If popular media, literature, and film are any indication, the images that people typically draw to mind when thinking of the future generally involve either 1) post-apocalyptic scenery 2) highly-advanced technology or 3) interplanetary and outerspace travel.

Lea_Nolan
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Guest Fest: Lea Nolan Discusses her Gullah Root Worker in her Upcoming Novel “Conjure”

Lea_NolanThanks so much for having me, Alicia it is truly a pleasure to be here for Guest Fest!

Since this post is supposed to address paranormal and color, I thought it would be a perfect opportunity to introduce one of the characters in my upcoming debut, CONJURE, the first book in The Hoodoo Apprentice series.

 In CONJURE, Miss Delia Whitaker is a ninety-seven year old Gullah root worker who lives on St. Helena Island in the South Carolina low country. Miss Delia’s not just any conjurer, she’s the island’s premier hoodoo practitioner and wise woman. When my heroine, Emma Guthrie, her brother and their best friend unleash a wicked flesh-eating curse that threatens their lives, they turn to Miss Delia for help in learning the magic to break the hex.

Mocha_Memoirs_Press_logo_b_small
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Guest Fest: Mocha Memoirs Press is Accepting Submissions

Mocha_Memoirs_Press_logo_b_small06/13/2012 Updated Submission information  at the end of this interview.

I’m excited that my Guestfest has begun.This week, I have a wonderful interview with Nicole Kurtz from Mocha Memoirs Press. I’m very excited to share that they’re open for submissions.  I’d like to invite readers and authors to post questions for Nicole. She said that she’d be available to respond. 

black_scifi_logo_4
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The State of Black SciFi 2012: I heart Onyx Con!

black_scifi_logo_4In the late 1990s, I remember attending a panel discussion of African-American SF authors at Robert W. Woodruff Library in the Atlanta University Center. The panel included my favorites like Octavia Butler and Brandon Massey. It was the first time that I’d ever participated in an event that highlighted a variety of African-American authors in SF. I was elated.

BlackFictionEvent2
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Come Join ATL’s State of Black Sci-Fi Authors at Georgia Tech

Time: February 16, 2012 from 6:30pm to 8:30pmLocation: Clough Commons Auditorium, Georgia TechOrganized By: Geogia Tech Science Fiction Department Event Description:Come join us as we discuss the state of Black Science Fiction, share our stories and perform a group reading created especially for this event. Participating in this first of its kind event are Ed […]

Escape_From_Beckyville
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Interview with Author Nicole Sconiers: Beckyville has the Snarky, Racial Humor of Undercover Brother Mixed with the Sophistication of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man.

Escape_From_BeckyvilleI met Nicole Sconiers at OnyxCon 3 in Atlanta. I immediately downloaded the Beckyville short stories and dug-in. I couldn’t stop reading them. The stories push the envelope of issues that pertain to African-American women such as issues surrounding hair, attitude, rage, and injustice. These stories are not for the faint of heart. Sconiers uses speculative fiction to share those internalized emotions and feelings that some Black women have towards being victimized and treated as if they are racially inferior but it’s done in a snarky, satirical manner. I especially love the stories that expose issues surrounding Black women’s hair. I know I am always asked about my Sisterlocks. LOL!

Laura_Elliott
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Guest Blogger: Laura A. H. Elliott Talks About Writing Latinas and Mariachis

Laura_ElliottWhen fear’s as blind as love, how far would you go to find your happily ever after? Winnemucca is a story about a teenage girl’s enchanted road trip to her true self. The main character, Ginny, is Latina but has grown up in a largely non-Hispanic culture. Nonetheless, she is drawn to the cultural roots that run in her blood and her road trip is a means of allowing that part of her to blossom. In this excerpt from Winnemucca, Ginny is on the road with Las Rosas Rojas y Adoradads, a group of mariachis: